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This shows how naive the Armenians are in politics, media as well as technology. This is another expert's opinion.. I wish Armenians will devote this kind of dedication and energy in real Armenian activities. I can't believe Armenians would fall for this, and jump to it as if all our future existence depends on it.

We have become so very limited with our Genocide past!! There is nothing on the page about what the purpose of this poll is, who is collecting the votes, for whom this voting is being done, who is going to use this poll, etc Today, our struggle has moved from the battlefield to the fields of diplomacy, economic development, and creation of statehood with a strong army. In these fields, our success relies on elimination of the obstacles that hinder the normal development of the state, political and public structures of Armenia as well as the efficiency, the unity of the nation and the establishment of fairness in the country.

The new The ARS Chairperson attended a meeting of the local chapter members on the first evening of her arrival in Cyprus, where she gave an extensive report on the organisations activities and on-going projects. The evening was concluded with a dinner at a local taverna.

On Wednesday, 4th May, Ms. Minassian visited community centres and was interviewed by CyBC. In the evening she was the guest of honour at a dinner at the Laiki Sporting Club, where she was introduced by the "Sosse" chapter chairperson Vera Tavitian. The following day was dedicated to a working meeting with the representatives of ARS regions around the Middle East, who had also arrived for this occasion.

Various international projects, such as the planned fund raising with a target of five million dollars, were discussed during this meeting attended by representatives from Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Israel, Kuwait and Cyprus. Minassian departed on Friday 6th May for Cairo, Egypt. Enriched by new cast like Marie Lou Jourian, Naira Tokatlian and Araxi Guereghian, Hamazkayin's Oshakan Chapter proved once more that their programme of cultural happenings are the heartbeat of Armenian Cypriot cultural life.

Under the expert guidance of director Janna Tahmizian, Timag's cast have excelled from keen amateur theater performers to actors in their own right with performances that touch excellence. Unfortunately, like most of the community events, quality Armenian cultural events are supported by the very few.

Only community members attended Timag's performance. As a community we seem to have an opinion on details of community happenings, programme details on how we should commemorate April 24 and on how we should preserve very rightly so our burial grounds, but when it comes to the community life of the living, we seem to be absent.

If this is the case, the only question that remains unanswered is the following. American Turks in Denial I wonder which idiot convinced this bunch of fools to go out and ridicule themselves in public? I think these are paid protesters. Plus free milk and cookies afterwards, thank you very much. Now go home. Hang on. But, to complete the freak show, where are the handsomely paid professional wailing women pulling at their own hair and beating their own chests?

How could the organisers miss such fine details? I have printed out Gibrahayer and will give it to my husband, Ara, to read. As I stated, my husband was born and brought up in Nicosia, Cyprus. My maiden name was, Atashian. I look forward to receiving your E-magazine regarding news about Cyprus. Keep up the good work.

The Awards will be held on May 19, at the world famous Palladium, Hollywood. They will arrive on May There will be some events scheduled during their stay in Los Angeles. At the awards, there will be special seating arrangements made for Melkoniantsis and friends of Kohar. For more information visit www. I can be reached at and markchenian msn.

Soon he was making data sets and analysing reams of figures. He stressed that data is like any other story. Asad also runs courses to equip local residents with the tools to report on the issues that affect them.

Social media entrepreneur Nathalie McDermott international, was nominated for her work setting up social networking sites with fringe communities. On Road Media was founded in to advise marginalised communities on how they can best voice their issues in the media. James Ball investigative, was nominated for his work within data journalism.

He has analysed thousands of Iraq War logs, as well as US embassy cables. The innovation came at a time when publications were looking to make online media profitable. The Bureau will celebrate its first birthday on 26 April.

Being part of the WikiLeaks story put us on the map. Also we have had stories in all key media outlets: Panorama, Dispatches, Channel 4 News, the Today programme, a partnership with the FT, front page stories in The Independent and pieces in the Guardian. What do you think WikiLeaks has done for investigative journalism? Our government is opening up the databases of Britain and journalists will have to deal with huge databases. Do you think all journalists are going to have to embrace data journalism?

Do you get paid for your journalism? We get paid to make television because it is very expensive to make. Because we are not-for-profit, if we ever make any money it gets put straight back into the organisation. Is it feasible to be self-funding? That is one of the questions we are asking ourselves. Is there a financial self-sustaining. Do you think there is a danger of society becoming too transparent? There are two opposing sides: one is the opening up of government and one is the closing down of personal privacy.

What do you think of the proposal for notification prior to publishing? I totally understand why Max Moseley wants to see privacy laws tightened. But the press have the right to know when a person of influence is breaking the law or causing a human rights violation. Do you think there is room for investigative journalism on the internet?

No one is going to go to a certain place on the internet to read investigative pieces. They are too involved and too long. Investigative journalism works best in a mix, within a paper or a news programme. What are your plans for the BIJ for ? To build on what we achieved in , to cement relationships and to further our recognition. So why not leave school at 18 and go straight in? Steve Jobs dropped out of university, as did Bill Gates.

Then by all means, go. In , 7, students were on undergraduate media courses. Ten years later there were 25, Yet the number of jobs in the UK news industry has shrunk by per cent since , so why do so many people want to train as journalists when there are no jobs? I can tell you why. Because working in the media is not like working. Print is going to be like the hotel and security.

There is no money in journalism and the queue to get a job stretches 20 times round the block. The print business is working out ways of getting rid of you, not hiring you. Print is a very small business. Learning on the job is a tougher regime than 30 of you sitting in a classroom.

But no amount of an academic explaining X, Y and Z at university is going to give you news sense, even if you have a PhD. Unfortunately, they will find out too late and when in a lot of debt. Local newspaper groups should change their hiring policy and start recruiting people at 18, not They are idiots not to. I can understand those who do media courses for skilled subjects, like animation or film direction and editing but there does not need to be a separate academic focus for the writing process.

Writing is personal and subjective. From the age of 21 to 60, I. And what do you need to know about the law? If you want to avoid libel a be accurate and b have the goods. What is there to know beyond that? I would shut down all the journalism colleges. There are over 80 schools in the UK teaching journalism but these courses are make-work projects for retired journalists, some of whom have been successful in the past and have chosen the academic route to give something back.

There is no merit whatsoever in going to university if you want to be a print journalist. You should go straight from school and start working on a local newspaper. Just like I did. Her winning entry was an investigative report into the dangers of aerotoxic syndrome. This could relate to everyone who flies. The competition is held annually in memory of Tom Walker, an acclaimed foreign correspondent who died of cancer in His feature won the UK category for written press, announced in May Speaking of the UK award, Trilling said he was pleased his article had been selected.

I hope the nomination means the article will be more widely read and disseminated. Roberts, who now works at the Daily Mail, received much positive feedback for her two foreign news pitches. She pitched her City dissertation piece on hostage negotiation as well as a story about Sri Lankan Tamils who deliberately get their daughters pregnant.

City alumni fared well: three ex-students won category awards, and three came highly commended for efforts in their respective fields. Most promising student journalist of the year went to Moya Sarner magazine, , while Rachel Smith magazine, was highly commended. City students from the magazine MA class won the New Magazine Concept award for Ground, a publication for baristas.

The magazine concept was developed as part of a university project. Hutton, a reporter for Cambridge News, submitted features on student riots, street art and paddle boarding, which she researched and wrote in her spare time. The ceremony was held on 23 November Dehghan, who studies on the international MA, reported for the Guardian, exposing the corruption underpinning the election results.

As an Iranian myself it was very important to me to go and report on the trouble. The documentary saw Dehghan interview the family and friends of AghaSoltan who was shot dead while watching a protest against the election result. Today Agha-Soltan is regarded as an emblem of freedom among Iranians.

Professor Schifferes charted the history 0. Bradshaw explained how technology had changed the linear nature of news production, and said that some journalists had confused the new mediums used to deliver content for the content itself. He went on to outline vital skills that the next generation of financial reporters must gain in order to ensure the successful future of financial journalism. Media access to the event was restricted by Assange who feared professional journalists would hijack the debate and turn it into a press conference.

The huge problem is that nobody knows where the boundaries of that concept are. The team shared insights and advice with about 50 postgraduates and undergraduates on the opportunities in specialist consumer, B2B and customer magazines, and newswires. Izabel Grindal head of content integration, Reuters, founder, Reuters professional women's network.

When I began my career, newsrooms were still something of a boys club. The City course was incredibly competitive so we were well prepared. At Reuters it was like the diplomatic service: white British and American men, travelling the world with their wives in tow.

I was very surprised to become a news editor after only two years, which helped me become the first woman on the editorial management team. When we merged with Thomson it became a global group with nearly 1, members. There have been a lot of highlights during my career at Reuters, such as covering European summits and Olympic Games. My father [Peter Preston, editor of the Guardian ] never wanted me to go into journalism and he never talked about it at home.

Getting into journalism was a complete accident. I broke my kneecap playing football during my first year at university and decided to have a bash at the student paper while I was recovering. You actually have to have a bit of structure. I owe City quite a lot in that respect. I thought I knew everything about life. I thought I wanted to be a magazine journalist — but in fact I became a reporter in the City and I loved it.

I remember my first careers advisor suggesting accountancy; looking at numbers all day, never talking to anyone and never leaving my desk would have just been entirely unsuitable for me. Journalism was a lucky escape. My enduring bad memory of City was a coffee machine which had the nastiest cups and powdery drinks.

But I loved the course and I take every opportunity to say how valuable it was. It was a really important bridge year between being a student journalist and a working journalist. I remember one of my fellow students, Darius, got on a plane to Berlin when the wall came down and came back on Monday morning with a piece of the wall! A lot of your contemporaries go on to do amazing things. Technology has changed a lot since I was a trainee reporter for the BBC. I used to spend hours putting together radio pieces, editing the tape with a razor blade and pencil.

Sometimes I cut the wrong word out and had to scrabble around on the floor to find the piece of tape again. I had no ambition to be a TV presenter or newsreader and I found it quite hard to begin with being in the studio rather than on the road reporting. We had Professor Mike Bromley who tried to tell us about the information superhighway and the rise of the internet.

Five years later the internet began to change everything. On my first job, if I had to research a subject I would ring up a library department who would go off and look for stories in the library and then they would come up and give it to me. Now Google does the same job for me in under two seconds. City was a year to practise radio without getting sued. It was about developing as a journalist without the pressure of a professional environment. We were taught the practical skills.

We all hated the live streaming — I had to train myself not to flick the Vs at Scott [Mills]. But it increases your audience because you get people watching and listening online. I did the international course so I came at things from a different perspective; I always thought about everything in an international context.

I went on a fascinating reporting trip to Bhopal in India in Until then, I think [the media] had focused on the medical impact and the plight of the people who were critically injured by the gas leak 25 years earlier.

Alice Fisher, style correspondent, The Observer City taught me not to be prejudiced — to learn the trade instead of focusing on my byline. But City helped me see the benefit of trying anything and everything. Both titles had things to teach me. In my first job on a magazine, I was asked to phone a company in Singapore which was rumoured to be closing down.

I really wanted to write funny stuff. When I got my break in TV it was my ideal job. I met Aaron Sorkin the other day, he told me he liked my work. I always knew sport was my strength. I remember the first time I got paid to do journalism was to report on an England match at a pub. I was getting paid to watch a game of football and talk about it. That was the moment I realised the industry is brilliant. While on the course I learnt the importance of networking. We were exposed to a lot of senior people and we were always encouraged to take them for a glass of wine, create a relationship and build a rapport.

That advice stood me in good stead when I was approaching more senior roles and the jobs were decided by word of mouth rather than by application. City taught me to pitch for articles no one else wants to do. I went from interviewing notorious London gangsters like Mad Frankie Fraser while on work experience with The Face, to reviewing soft porn movies for Empire.

But a week later, I interviewed Gene Hackman and Keanu Reaves on a film set in Baltimore because no other staffer could go. The revelation for me was realising he was right. I started off reviewing soft porn and ended up interviewing Hollywood stars. BA Journalism. The need to come up with original ideas was drummed into us at City.

The first issue came out in There was space for a music title that was a bit more confrontational. I quickly learned that journalism is part of a much bigger creative. She said being a TV reporter was like being a window onto something more interesting. Finding your own voice sets you apart from other writers, and will make editors think of you, your tone, your style.

One week I can be having a tour of the new Frank Ghery building in Miami, the next I could be wandering round a market with a top chef, or interviewing Hollywood starlets. I learned to be aggressive. City helped me understand I had to go out there and do it myself. Nobody knows where journalism is going, but I think in a few years it will settle down. If you love this field and believe in it, learn about the new technology and learn as much of it as you can. Dive into it. Lis Howell [course leader for the broadcast MA] taught me the value of timekeeping.

City also taught me to write concisely; to condense my message and write effective proposals — I think this is one of the reasons why Casual Films has been so successful. Any company with a website is going to want video. TV Current Affairs. The course taught me that journalists have to be multi-skilled. I work across TV and web as well as writing stories and scripts.

We often have to self-shoot and self-edit. But the excitement of journalism is that every day, and every story, is different. We were taught how to go through company accounts and use computers to get stories from vast amounts of data. The course is really good at training you in all the different areas of the magazine. As an entertainment journalist I operate in a big structure which includes marketing and promotions. Everyone has their own agenda. At City I learnt that a strong editorial sense is essential, no matter what medium you work in.

We entered a work place in transition which meant new roles and new opportunities were opening up. When I left City I got a job as a web only reporter; a few people were curious that this job even existed. My job now is in radio and I knew almost nothing about radio production before; I learned it all doing the job. Being a foreign journalist means being confronted with new realities every time you travel. I travelled in post-war Sri Lanka and to Congo a few times and interviewed victims of rape and former child soldiers.

You have to take it all in and keep going. This cannot be taught, everyone has to learn it the hard way. Interview by Helena Lee. Undisputed bastion for quality journalism, he stands tall above the squalid antics of the gutter press. He is the heavyweight who fought relentlessly for compensation for the thalidomide children, a champion for investigative journalism, a thorn in the side of injustice. Evans has the bling to show for it — recognition from his fellow journalists means a Gold Award for Lifetime Achievements and a European Gold Medal.

He even has a knighthood for his services to journalism. Arise Saint Harry. Even Evans will play up to this reverence. Could he be past it? Within minutes of speaking to him he has answered my doubts. He tells me, from his Manhattan apartment, how handy he is with the tablet, well-informed of the improved features. His embrace of innovation is a theme that crops up continually during the interview, but more controversial Top: Last day after 14 years at The Sunday Times are his strong opinions on the failures of journalism and Bottom: A rare pause in his busy schedule how truth-seeking has been compromised.

There is Tina Brown, of course. Fair, The New Yorker and the now defunct Talk magazine. After a The first is the war in Iraq and the failure of journalists to uncover print hiatus editing online newspaper The Daily Beast she is now at what was really going on. Throughout the interview he celebrates stories that have over-influenced the news agenda. He suggests okay? The disease had already taken hold but nobody bothered even to diagnose or prescribe a remedy for it.

They were all. A lower threshold of boredom. You can print them in bigger and blacker type. As editor of. Any anger for Murdoch has dissipated. I ask whether he thinks Murdoch is guilty of perpetuating bad journalism. Evans elegantly declines to be drawn into rash judgments on Murdoch.

Piers Morgan or Larry King? Shakehand or penhold table-tennis grip? Sub or sandwich? But Saint Harry must fly. He must finish writing an article for a promised assignment. And with that — he is gone. Back to his Manhattan life and perhaps a cheeky game of chess on his iPad.

The Sunday Times from to he set up the celebrated Insight team. Leading the charge in investigative journalism, his thalidomide campaign has been a dogged pursuit since the s in which he is still actively engaged to this day. For Evans, America and innovation is inextricable. He is driving up the quality of tablet content by collaborating with photojournalist Lawrence Schiller on an iPad version of his US book The American Century. If we evolve the right financial model, we will enter a golden age of journalism.

Of course not - because he was born in Hawaii! And there you have a presidential candidate, one of these nut cases in the Republican party [getting it wrong]! Take Gawker [a gossip website] for instance. Holding people up. Evans is unequivocal — the answer is good journalism. So who is producing the best journalism? Given the phone tapping scandal and dumbing down accusations, the answer may.

You want a reaction. For me, to 1, words is journalistic sonnet form. You just get to know it, and you get to know how many ideas you can have in that space — probably three. The fear of the deadline can be exciting, but you have to get to a point where you trust yourself to do it. Jeremy [Clarkson, a friend and fellow columnist] writes incredibly fast and it reads like that — he can write his column in half an hour.

Everything I write takes four hours. Writing for America is very different. American publishing is incredibly over-manned — or properly manned, depending on how you see it. Here, you just get hit by Piers Morgan. The great thing about journalism is that you get these repeated, intense moments of accomplishment.

But I still get that little hit on Sunday. I still go down to get the papers, and the first thing I turn to is my byline. I still get that thrill about my name in print. That never goes away. Routine, rhythm and pleasing Rupert. Columnist and author AA Gill reveals his tricks of the trade. Words by Emma Dibdin. Apps to You can also share stories easily on Twitter, Facebook, Instapaper or by email.

It has a user friendly home page and sections include everything from local news to wacky world events and sports to entertainment. Apps for It includes charts for every possible pair of currencies — around 30, — with historical rates dating back up to a year. Frequent travellers can store their 10 favourite currencies for frequent monitoring.

Cost: Free. It pools flight information from around the world, granting you access to real-time flight itineraries. Maps, weather forecasts and flight issue predictions are also available and the app will send push alerts to your handset when the status of your flight changes. Word Lens is an essential purchase for any journalist with rusty language skills. It instantly translates printed words from one language into another with the built-in video camera.

The current version is only available in Spanish to English and vice versa but more languages will be available soon. It converts all media files into correct, web friendly formats. Foursquare is a valuable tool for the networking journalist.

It helps you meet contacts in the area as well as build up your profile. Hootsuite schedules when updates to your Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and other accounts go live. You can track your results and popularity and check industry trends. Edit your photos with Photoshop Express, a mobile version of the industry-standard Adobe Photoshop software. The app includes handy features that allow you to crop, rotate, colour-correct and tint photos.

Available on: iPhone, iPad, Android. Turn your phone into a mobile television studio using Qik. Available on: iPhone, Android, BlackBerry. Give your videos a professional finish with ReelDirector. Edit videos by arranging clips on the scrollable timeline, or make use of features like splicing and trimming clips, recording soundtracks, and inserting text and transitions into your videos.

Available on: iPhone, iPad. The app allows you to make text notes, take photos, record voice memos and then upload them to your online account. Keen note-takers can organise their files into different notebooks, and the smart search function can even find handwritten text from within your photos.

Available on: iPhone, iPad, Android, BlackBerry Dropbox converts your phone into a mobile hard disk, giving you remote access to files saved on your computer. Files that you drag into the Dropbox folder on your computer automatically sync with the app, allowing you to view them on the move, or from your online account. With Vlingo you can send text messages, dial contacts, search Google and update your Twitter or Facebook status, simply by speaking into your phone.

The app converts your words into text with remarkable accuracy, and can even read newly received messages to you aloud. Audio is available to download, or you can simply stream footage straight to your smartphone with Wi-Fi or a 3G connection. Cost: Free Available on: Android. Urbanspoon is the ultimate guide to eating out. It locates the nearest restaurants which you can filter according to area, price range or food type.

Or shake your phone and let the app select a restaurant at random. In Cut the Rope your task is to feed hungry monster OmNom. Weird but addictive. Cost: 59p Available on: iPhone, iPad Android version coming soon. Surely for editors throughout the land there can be no two sweeter words. The union of Prince William and Kate Middleton is a gift to journalists that will keep on giving, long after the vows are exchanged at Westminster Abbey. But as magazines, newspapers and broadcasters prepare to reveal the innermost secrets of the latest royal couple, what do we know about the working practices of the mysterious and occasionally exotic band of journalists who make a living reporting on the House of Windsor — the royal correspondents?

The relationship between the royals and the media is a tempestuous one. In some cases they are like family friends. For others, things are not so amicable. And it would appear that the royals are also capable of offending the press. That was about familiarity, introducing Kate to us and introducing us to Kate. Hughes remembers one such incident. Suspicions of hacking were raised when NoW published a story saying that Bradby had lent William broadcasting equipment to edit his gap year videos together, something that only he and two other people would have known.

But not all encounters between the press and the royals are so intimate. We once saw that the Queen had a hole in her shoe because she was sitting with her legs crossed. Lots of women were in fancy dress and scantily clad. Additional reporting by Harriet Thurley. Every day a little-known band of workers risk their lives to help foreign correspondents report in the most dangerous places on earth.

It ended with her bullet-ridden body being dumped at the side of the road in Basra. Al-Khal and freelance American journalist Steven Vincent had been investigating police death squads in Iraq. The two captives were eventually bundled out of the vehicle and told to run. She was hit once in the leg and twice in the chest. Their bodies were dumped together back in central Basra as a warning to all media workers in Iraq.

But the plight of al-Khal, who miraciously survived, was quickly forgotten. The fixer is often bodyguard, interviewer, guide to local traditions and cultures, historian and connection to elusive individuals, all in one.

The role is difficult to define, transgressing far beyond that of translator or driver and often including all of the traditional reporting jobs. Danger is the one certainty of working as a fixer in a war zone. In some instances, where it is too dangerous for the journalist to leave a protected zone, fixers can even be wholly responsible for a story.

But not only do fixers not receive the same prestige and credit as journalists, they are rarely afforded the same protection. She was transferred to Baghdad and protected in FBI custody. Until one day they decided it was time for her to move on. One such individual was Afghan fixer Ajmal Naqshbandi, who was beheaded by the Taliban in after he was kidnapped with Italian journalist Daniele Mastrogiacomo and their driver.

Mastrogiacomo was released in exchange for five Taliban militants but demands for two more militants for Naqshbandi were not met, provoking questions about the different valuation placed on journalists and fixers by the Italian government. This apparent lack of importance is a stark contrast to how invaluable fixers typically are.

Streetwise, trustworthy and 0. Top: Security forces try to control a crowd in front of the Palestinian parliament, Oct Bottom: Aftermath of an explosion in Rafah, Gaza The dependable fixer comes from all walks of life and in all guises. Sometimes a good fixer is also a local journalist or someone recommended by another correspondent. Or the correspondent might be greeted at Hyderabad airport in India by someone like Ali, an entrepreneur and fan of Sherlock Holmes novels from a tiny village nearby.

Ali spotted the opportunity to use his good English and colourfully decorated car to lift himself and his family out of poverty. Or the journalist might be lucky enough to be referred to Riko, a legendary figure in the East Congo fixing community, with his leather jackets, shades and reputation for introducing journalists to a cannibal rebel leader in a secret deep jungle location.

Finding a fixer can be particularly difficult in countries with strongly autocratic regimes, such as Algeria, Yemen, Syria, Libya and Iran, where even local journalists have no concept of a free, investigative press. In these countries it is hard sometimes to tell a fixer from a government spy. Adwan Adwan became a fixer in Gaza aged He worked for three years until he left to study journalism at City in Jazeera English and Bloomberg TV, is familiar with this difficulty.

I could be worth millions, especially if I was Italian or French; their governments almost always pay. For many individuals, working as a fixer is a life enriching experience not just because it pays so well. He recalls how Ali Kahan, the fixer he worked with in India, gained a prestigious reputation in his village.

When I helped a photojournalist and news editor from AFP cover the Israeli seizure of a neighbourhood in Rafah on 19 May , it was only chance that saved us from the Israeli air strike. We started out around 6am to cover the situation inside the besieged neighbourhood. People from inside were being interviewed live on the radio. We have kids. Here, the police were able to protect all of them together. Someone told us that there was a peaceful demonstration against the siege.

We were driving towards it, just minutes away, when there was a loud explosion and plumes of smoke. The journalists were really scared. We could have been there. So we stopped the car for a few minutes and waited to see what had happened. When we arrived we found there had been 11 killed. Their bodies had all been evacuated but it was still a mess. There was blood everywhere. And body parts. In these situations the protocol is to go from the scene to the hospital, where you can interview families of the dead.

But not all of the bodies could fit in the morgue because it was already full from previous days. Some were in a big fridge nearby usually used for storing flowers. The bodies were in rows with blood soaked sheets over them. But you could still see their faces. I give the world peace, love and beauty with my flowers and this is what I get back.

Dead people, blood, misery, sadness. Sometimes we finish as late as 11 or 12pm, grab a few hours sleep and then get up again if something big happens. It is very important not to get wrong what somebody has said. You can get into a lot of trouble in Gaza. She says that on occasion journalists have neglected to pay her for researching and writing entire stories anyway.

All they could find out was his name, the fact that he had been killed by a suicide bomber as he left a hotel in Baghdad, and that he had worked for The Times for seven years. Clearly they had no clue who he was, because there was no contract, no other paperwork. No journalist would. Agha was beheaded and Mastrogiacomo released in exchange for the release of five Taliban militants.

Demands for two more in exchange for fixer Naqshbandi were not met and he was beheaded two weeks later. Other fixers find it hard to maintain such conviction in the value of their work. We argued and he stormed off, but we made up the next day. This, Cookson admits, is the nature of news. Many are like Iraqi fixer Yasser who, when the International Federation of Journalists IFJ came to record his death in their annual report on media staff.

Palestinian civilians rush for cover during a clash between Fatah militants and militants of the Hamas movement, June It can mean the difference between getting treatment or dying. Thousands of miles away in the UK, it is understandable that news desks might underappreciate the role of the fixer, either failing to credit them with a byline or neglecting to report their abduction or death.

By and large good reporters do that. She felt that she was not only abandoned by the FBI but also by most of the journalists she worked for. In the end she was rescued primarily, she says, because of the efforts of the widow of Steven Vincent, the journalist who was murdered alongside her. This was a long and difficult process, taking 18 months of dedication on the part of Ramaci. Al-Khal is all too aware of how easily she could have been forgotten, left living alone in a hotel, unable to find a job or even see relatives in Baghdad for fear of jeopardising their safety.

Many fixers have been used and abandoned and betrayed. Many of them. He was murdered when the crew stopped to film the border between Lebanon and Israel. Takkoush stayed in the car to phone his son while the others got out. He was telling his son not to worry because they were in a quiet place when an Israeli shell smashed into his Mercedes. The commander held the pair captive for eight months.

They managed to escape by tiring their guards with a game of checkers, sneaking past once they were asleep and climbing over the ten foot wall of the compound. This is business time. In , at the age of 45 and after 23 successful years in newspapers — he was at various times financial editor and political editor at The Financial Times and City editor at The Sunday Telegraph — he made the transition to television.

I took the view that the way to approach that kind of thing was to respond to criticism that was constructive and ignore the stuff that was personal and horrible. In the run up to the financial crash of , he was one of the few people who warned of problems within the markets. But did I do enough to warn about what was coming? But why not? Until it was too late. And then there was the housing market. The general consensus, among economists and journalists alike, was that house prices were rising and would continue to do so.

Every newspaper had a property supplement, and property advertising brought in huge revenues. That the fact that I reported that Northern Rock had run out of money and gone to the Bank of England for a bail out caused the so-called run. Well, as a journalist it was a very difficult time. The challenge will be trying to persuade people that deepening their knowledge of all this stuff matters, even in the good times.

Now hacks fight for space with NYU students. Try the dry Manhattan. Hotel Nacional de Cuba Foreign correspondents rub shoulders with international film stars at this bar that offers sunset views over the Florida Straits. Usher your source inside for a private conversation, and order a Havana Club on the rocks to get them on side.

Calle O, Havana. Mingle with famous footballers over a Birra Moretti. Piazzale Lotto 14, Milan. Juan Valdez offers a relaxed and discreet atmosphere - important, as competition between journalists is often intense in Columbia. Some of the best stories start life over a round of drinks. The Bookworm This is a lending library with a difference.

Here Time Out journalists pore over books as a barman pours them drinks. Sip a mojito, made with mint grown on the rooftop garden. Nan Sanlitun Rd, Beijing. Ying Yang Take sources to the rooftop bar for views of skyscrapers and boutiques along the Ann Siang Road.

Try a lychee martini. Sippers Bar Close to Al Jazeera offices, this is a popular pub for discerning wire service reporters. It was a refuge for journalists during the election crisis in Hacks turned up for much-needed sustenance while they wrote. Argwings Kodhek Rd, Nairobi. The Opera Bar In the hub of the city under the shadow of skyscrapers and overlooking the Opera House, this bar is a post-work favourite with journalists.

It is teeming with hacks on a Friday night networking amid the stunning views. Sydney Opera House, Sydney For an interactive map on where to get sauced go to xcity-magazine. Journalists join the crowd for story tip-offs from Samoans. Apia, Upolu, Samoa. But how easy is it to make the leap and can novel writing pay the bills?

Elizabeth Davis reports. Works by journalists fill the shelves in bookstores and, perhaps unsurprisingly, it is non-fiction that dominates — whether accessible history from Andrew Marr or uproarious autobiography from Caitlin Moran. Writing fiction has also proved a lucrative career path for a growing number of journalists. Among City alumni alone, more than 40 boast the title of novelist or author.

So as newspaper and magazine circulations continue to tumble, now might seem the perfect time to dig out and dust off that manuscript from the bottom drawer. And surely a background in journalism would be the ideal preparation for writing books? Jonathan Myerson thinks not. Writing a news story, on the other hand, usually demands that all key facts are provided in the first paragraph and ideally in the first sentence.

The novelist must leave questions unanswered. They have to hold back, they would kill a novel by making it clear. She decided to sign up to the novel writing MA at City University when she moved back to England from Dubai last summer. But I always liked to write so I took the easy route and just started freelancing.

Having worked for many years as a science journalist, Hersham began writing fiction. The White Road and Other Stories is her first collection. All of which would not be ideal for journalism — it is certainly not what I was trained to do. Once you know how to write and ask questions, you know how to write a good novel. A plot is basically a story, you use the same skills for both. Where journalism is often collaborative, hectic and noisy, novel writing demands that you work alone and quietly.

Jojo Moyes newspaper, worked as a reporter and news editor at The Independent for 10 years before jumping ship. Moyes says the change in working environment was what she found hardest. I loved the people I worked with, the banter, the black humour, the adrenaline of meeting deadlines. To go from that hardcore national newspaper journalism to.

I found journalism far easier than novel-writing. Having a brief, a word count and the whip of a deadline is more contained than saying to yourself. I find it very easy for days to go by without writing. Journalism also greatly helped my writing style. I was lucky enough to start out at a very good paper with editors who cared about the writing. I was encouraged to write in my voice and that helped me to establish what my voice was.

Having said that, in journalism you are directed by the nature of the publication you are writing for. There is the assumption that novel writing is the greater attainment. It may be, but they are very different skills. Now I do a lot of other things to pay the bills.

Until recently, I never took advances on work — I just wrote the book and sold it. I had the good fortune of being paid a great deal of money to do a weekly column at The Independent, so on the proceeds of that I could finance writing my novels. Saul Bellow goes for a run every morning to get inspired — I must do that sometime! I would say, cut back on the talking about it and do it.

As told to Olivia Wakefield. Compared to most journalism, novel writing is poorly paid. I feel like the safest thing is not to be dependent on one stream of income. Most writers I know have two or three strings to their bow and do a bit of journalism on the side.

I think the safest thing is not to let anything dry up. Between roughly and the book world had this unprecedented boom in terms of the money that was generated by it. They were over paid. This period was an aberration, which is now over. Very few people [now] make a lot of money out of selling books in the UK. The fees that are paid by publishers to authors have been frozen for several years, and in some cases cut.

I was earning more per book ten years ago than I am today. I have just about reached the point where it is becoming impossible to earn a living. A publisher. It gives you a profile and access to lots of extraordinary stories. Also when you initially speak to a publisher or an agent they know that you have a history of published writing, they know you have some kind of track record.

Imogen Edwards-Jones believes this can give hacks a distinct advantage. Publishers say there are two types of journalists who become authors: those that hit the deadline and those who never get the book done in the first. The top prize spend the cream of your working day alone writing something no in the BBC National Short Story Award — the biggest in the world for one sees and may never see. The vast majority of advances are now tiny for novelists and Whichever route someone takes into novel writing, the key is a print journalism is being squeezed by free online content.

So which strong desire to write. AD Miller, author and Britain editor on The is the more viable career? The answer may lie not in attempting to Economist, published his first book Snowdrops earlier this year. The idea is the hardest bit, then And therein, perhaps, lies the moral of this tale. Journalism definitely prepared me well. But you have to think your. George Eliot Eliot, whose real name was Mary Ann Evans, began writing for the Westminster Review, a radical journal, in She later became its editor, putting her at the heart of literary society at the time.

Her first novel, Adam Bede, was published in to great success. This was followed by Middlemarch , and The Mill on the Floss Photo: the Guardian. Mark Twain River boat pilot, soldier and journalist. Twain tried his hand at all these careers before writing novels. He went on to work for a string of papers including the San Francisco Call and published his most famous work, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, in Guy de Maupassant Maupassant was a poet and short story writer at the heart of Parisian literary life.

But he also worked as a journalist and editor. His sparse writing style, it has been argued, stems from his work as a journalist and short story writer. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in It sold so well that Greene left his job to become a full-time novelist. Unfortunately his next two books were commercial failures but these were soon followed by A Gun for Sale and Our Man in Havana , before his most famous work, Brighton Rock was published in Twit Awards The votes are in, the Twitterati wait with bated breath.

Miranda Thompson reveals the top Twits of the year. The judging panel witnessed outstanding dedication to the cause of character updates. Nominees were compiled using a variety of criteria: activity online, prominence in their field and quality of published content. To view the shortlist of nominees for the Twit Awards, go to x-citymagazine. Judges enjoyed her comprehensive coverage of life in the Glamour office, from free cakes to fashion week highlights.

Choice music selections from the front line of radio are mixed in with viral video content and banter from his blog. Those with an insatiable appetite for gossip should refer to his long-running feud with Katie Price. Watch her timeline to see the newscaster in action as she collects information to update or break stories, as well as chatting back to keen followers. Dismissed as obsolete and under threat from bloggers - is criticism on its last legs? Elizabeth Davis and Emma Dibdin talk to four leading critics to get the diagnosis.

The explosion of online criticism happened at the same time as a lot of US papers laid off film critics, so people made a connection between the two.

SPREAD BETTING UK SHARES VALUE

I think these are paid protesters. Plus free milk and cookies afterwards, thank you very much. Now go home. Hang on. But, to complete the freak show, where are the handsomely paid professional wailing women pulling at their own hair and beating their own chests? How could the organisers miss such fine details?

I have printed out Gibrahayer and will give it to my husband, Ara, to read. As I stated, my husband was born and brought up in Nicosia, Cyprus. My maiden name was, Atashian. I look forward to receiving your E-magazine regarding news about Cyprus. Keep up the good work. The Awards will be held on May 19, at the world famous Palladium, Hollywood.

They will arrive on May There will be some events scheduled during their stay in Los Angeles. At the awards, there will be special seating arrangements made for Melkoniantsis and friends of Kohar. For more information visit www. I can be reached at and markchenian msn. Apkarian, Sevag and I are looking forward to see you all. It is irresponsible to invite Turkey to join Europe.

We refuse accession of Turkey to the European Union. Kennedy's current trip and State's position on Annan Plan-5, it is time to call the Annan Plan-5 what it really is. The Annan Plan-5 is an extreme and blatant example of political and economic corruption in which the violator, Turkey, is rewarded and the victims, the Greek Cypriots, punished.

It rivals and exceeds the recent business corporate corruption scandals in the U. I confirmed the Prelature's identification of some, and found some others which were NOT on their list last year but I couldn't complete the cataloguing of the cemetery this May as I intended, for obvious reasons.

This may also be of some help to those of your subscribers who do not read Armenian, and you are welcome to put it in Gibrahayer. Anmah BOOK REVIEW Gibrahayer May 10, - Tatiana Ferahian Written in the general realm of manipulated narratives, Yacoubian blends the line between illusion and reality, cultivating the ambiguous line at which his characters become trapped or misguided by their own choices, often addressing themes of domination: the psyche by the dream, the conscience by guilt, the personality by passion.

Avalo is an intense arabesque of poetic attitude, weaving highly charged observations with the surreal, nightmarish dreams capes to capture the dissatisfaction of the eponymous hero as he tries to salvage some meaning from his experiences. At times dense, often scathingly witty, and never less than challenging, Avalo is testament to Yacoubian's restless search for 'starwealthinss'. Ambassador to Armenia John Evans participated in the ceremony of opening the new building of the U.

Lian Kechijian, an Armenian member of the Uruguay parliament, has played a great role in the decision. N: Quote, Profile, Research on Wednesday, offering to more than double his stake to 8. The handover took place in Agdam. Return leg on Thursday 12 May May , with the participation of ten countries. Details to follow. Marie Louise sings at Champs Club every Friday. Contact Vartoog Karageulian on Contact Krikor Mahdessian on Classes for all ages. Internet edition on www. Please adjust your settings accordingly to ensure you receive Gibrahayer.

The last five issues are stored at the Archives section of the above link, where you can also subscribe to our e-magazine. Unfortunately, they will find out too late and when in a lot of debt. Local newspaper groups should change their hiring policy and start recruiting people at 18, not They are idiots not to.

I can understand those who do media courses for skilled subjects, like animation or film direction and editing but there does not need to be a separate academic focus for the writing process. Writing is personal and subjective. From the age of 21 to 60, I. And what do you need to know about the law? If you want to avoid libel a be accurate and b have the goods. What is there to know beyond that? I would shut down all the journalism colleges. There are over 80 schools in the UK teaching journalism but these courses are make-work projects for retired journalists, some of whom have been successful in the past and have chosen the academic route to give something back.

There is no merit whatsoever in going to university if you want to be a print journalist. You should go straight from school and start working on a local newspaper. Just like I did. Her winning entry was an investigative report into the dangers of aerotoxic syndrome. This could relate to everyone who flies. The competition is held annually in memory of Tom Walker, an acclaimed foreign correspondent who died of cancer in His feature won the UK category for written press, announced in May Speaking of the UK award, Trilling said he was pleased his article had been selected.

I hope the nomination means the article will be more widely read and disseminated. Roberts, who now works at the Daily Mail, received much positive feedback for her two foreign news pitches. She pitched her City dissertation piece on hostage negotiation as well as a story about Sri Lankan Tamils who deliberately get their daughters pregnant.

City alumni fared well: three ex-students won category awards, and three came highly commended for efforts in their respective fields. Most promising student journalist of the year went to Moya Sarner magazine, , while Rachel Smith magazine, was highly commended. City students from the magazine MA class won the New Magazine Concept award for Ground, a publication for baristas.

The magazine concept was developed as part of a university project. Hutton, a reporter for Cambridge News, submitted features on student riots, street art and paddle boarding, which she researched and wrote in her spare time. The ceremony was held on 23 November Dehghan, who studies on the international MA, reported for the Guardian, exposing the corruption underpinning the election results.

As an Iranian myself it was very important to me to go and report on the trouble. The documentary saw Dehghan interview the family and friends of AghaSoltan who was shot dead while watching a protest against the election result. Today Agha-Soltan is regarded as an emblem of freedom among Iranians. Professor Schifferes charted the history 0. Bradshaw explained how technology had changed the linear nature of news production, and said that some journalists had confused the new mediums used to deliver content for the content itself.

He went on to outline vital skills that the next generation of financial reporters must gain in order to ensure the successful future of financial journalism. Media access to the event was restricted by Assange who feared professional journalists would hijack the debate and turn it into a press conference.

The huge problem is that nobody knows where the boundaries of that concept are. The team shared insights and advice with about 50 postgraduates and undergraduates on the opportunities in specialist consumer, B2B and customer magazines, and newswires.

Izabel Grindal head of content integration, Reuters, founder, Reuters professional women's network. When I began my career, newsrooms were still something of a boys club. The City course was incredibly competitive so we were well prepared. At Reuters it was like the diplomatic service: white British and American men, travelling the world with their wives in tow.

I was very surprised to become a news editor after only two years, which helped me become the first woman on the editorial management team. When we merged with Thomson it became a global group with nearly 1, members. There have been a lot of highlights during my career at Reuters, such as covering European summits and Olympic Games.

My father [Peter Preston, editor of the Guardian ] never wanted me to go into journalism and he never talked about it at home. Getting into journalism was a complete accident. I broke my kneecap playing football during my first year at university and decided to have a bash at the student paper while I was recovering. You actually have to have a bit of structure.

I owe City quite a lot in that respect. I thought I knew everything about life. I thought I wanted to be a magazine journalist — but in fact I became a reporter in the City and I loved it. I remember my first careers advisor suggesting accountancy; looking at numbers all day, never talking to anyone and never leaving my desk would have just been entirely unsuitable for me.

Journalism was a lucky escape. My enduring bad memory of City was a coffee machine which had the nastiest cups and powdery drinks. But I loved the course and I take every opportunity to say how valuable it was. It was a really important bridge year between being a student journalist and a working journalist.

I remember one of my fellow students, Darius, got on a plane to Berlin when the wall came down and came back on Monday morning with a piece of the wall! A lot of your contemporaries go on to do amazing things. Technology has changed a lot since I was a trainee reporter for the BBC.

I used to spend hours putting together radio pieces, editing the tape with a razor blade and pencil. Sometimes I cut the wrong word out and had to scrabble around on the floor to find the piece of tape again. I had no ambition to be a TV presenter or newsreader and I found it quite hard to begin with being in the studio rather than on the road reporting. We had Professor Mike Bromley who tried to tell us about the information superhighway and the rise of the internet. Five years later the internet began to change everything.

On my first job, if I had to research a subject I would ring up a library department who would go off and look for stories in the library and then they would come up and give it to me. Now Google does the same job for me in under two seconds. City was a year to practise radio without getting sued.

It was about developing as a journalist without the pressure of a professional environment. We were taught the practical skills. We all hated the live streaming — I had to train myself not to flick the Vs at Scott [Mills]. But it increases your audience because you get people watching and listening online. I did the international course so I came at things from a different perspective; I always thought about everything in an international context. I went on a fascinating reporting trip to Bhopal in India in Until then, I think [the media] had focused on the medical impact and the plight of the people who were critically injured by the gas leak 25 years earlier.

Alice Fisher, style correspondent, The Observer City taught me not to be prejudiced — to learn the trade instead of focusing on my byline. But City helped me see the benefit of trying anything and everything. Both titles had things to teach me. In my first job on a magazine, I was asked to phone a company in Singapore which was rumoured to be closing down.

I really wanted to write funny stuff. When I got my break in TV it was my ideal job. I met Aaron Sorkin the other day, he told me he liked my work. I always knew sport was my strength. I remember the first time I got paid to do journalism was to report on an England match at a pub. I was getting paid to watch a game of football and talk about it. That was the moment I realised the industry is brilliant. While on the course I learnt the importance of networking. We were exposed to a lot of senior people and we were always encouraged to take them for a glass of wine, create a relationship and build a rapport.

That advice stood me in good stead when I was approaching more senior roles and the jobs were decided by word of mouth rather than by application. City taught me to pitch for articles no one else wants to do. I went from interviewing notorious London gangsters like Mad Frankie Fraser while on work experience with The Face, to reviewing soft porn movies for Empire. But a week later, I interviewed Gene Hackman and Keanu Reaves on a film set in Baltimore because no other staffer could go.

The revelation for me was realising he was right. I started off reviewing soft porn and ended up interviewing Hollywood stars. BA Journalism. The need to come up with original ideas was drummed into us at City. The first issue came out in There was space for a music title that was a bit more confrontational.

I quickly learned that journalism is part of a much bigger creative. She said being a TV reporter was like being a window onto something more interesting. Finding your own voice sets you apart from other writers, and will make editors think of you, your tone, your style. One week I can be having a tour of the new Frank Ghery building in Miami, the next I could be wandering round a market with a top chef, or interviewing Hollywood starlets.

I learned to be aggressive. City helped me understand I had to go out there and do it myself. Nobody knows where journalism is going, but I think in a few years it will settle down. If you love this field and believe in it, learn about the new technology and learn as much of it as you can. Dive into it. Lis Howell [course leader for the broadcast MA] taught me the value of timekeeping. City also taught me to write concisely; to condense my message and write effective proposals — I think this is one of the reasons why Casual Films has been so successful.

Any company with a website is going to want video. TV Current Affairs. The course taught me that journalists have to be multi-skilled. I work across TV and web as well as writing stories and scripts. We often have to self-shoot and self-edit. But the excitement of journalism is that every day, and every story, is different.

We were taught how to go through company accounts and use computers to get stories from vast amounts of data. The course is really good at training you in all the different areas of the magazine. As an entertainment journalist I operate in a big structure which includes marketing and promotions. Everyone has their own agenda. At City I learnt that a strong editorial sense is essential, no matter what medium you work in. We entered a work place in transition which meant new roles and new opportunities were opening up.

When I left City I got a job as a web only reporter; a few people were curious that this job even existed. My job now is in radio and I knew almost nothing about radio production before; I learned it all doing the job. Being a foreign journalist means being confronted with new realities every time you travel. I travelled in post-war Sri Lanka and to Congo a few times and interviewed victims of rape and former child soldiers. You have to take it all in and keep going.

This cannot be taught, everyone has to learn it the hard way. Interview by Helena Lee. Undisputed bastion for quality journalism, he stands tall above the squalid antics of the gutter press. He is the heavyweight who fought relentlessly for compensation for the thalidomide children, a champion for investigative journalism, a thorn in the side of injustice. Evans has the bling to show for it — recognition from his fellow journalists means a Gold Award for Lifetime Achievements and a European Gold Medal.

He even has a knighthood for his services to journalism. Arise Saint Harry. Even Evans will play up to this reverence. Could he be past it? Within minutes of speaking to him he has answered my doubts. He tells me, from his Manhattan apartment, how handy he is with the tablet, well-informed of the improved features. His embrace of innovation is a theme that crops up continually during the interview, but more controversial Top: Last day after 14 years at The Sunday Times are his strong opinions on the failures of journalism and Bottom: A rare pause in his busy schedule how truth-seeking has been compromised.

There is Tina Brown, of course. Fair, The New Yorker and the now defunct Talk magazine. After a The first is the war in Iraq and the failure of journalists to uncover print hiatus editing online newspaper The Daily Beast she is now at what was really going on. Throughout the interview he celebrates stories that have over-influenced the news agenda.

He suggests okay? The disease had already taken hold but nobody bothered even to diagnose or prescribe a remedy for it. They were all. A lower threshold of boredom. You can print them in bigger and blacker type. As editor of. Any anger for Murdoch has dissipated. I ask whether he thinks Murdoch is guilty of perpetuating bad journalism.

Evans elegantly declines to be drawn into rash judgments on Murdoch. Piers Morgan or Larry King? Shakehand or penhold table-tennis grip? Sub or sandwich? But Saint Harry must fly. He must finish writing an article for a promised assignment. And with that — he is gone. Back to his Manhattan life and perhaps a cheeky game of chess on his iPad. The Sunday Times from to he set up the celebrated Insight team. Leading the charge in investigative journalism, his thalidomide campaign has been a dogged pursuit since the s in which he is still actively engaged to this day.

For Evans, America and innovation is inextricable. He is driving up the quality of tablet content by collaborating with photojournalist Lawrence Schiller on an iPad version of his US book The American Century. If we evolve the right financial model, we will enter a golden age of journalism. Of course not - because he was born in Hawaii! And there you have a presidential candidate, one of these nut cases in the Republican party [getting it wrong]! Take Gawker [a gossip website] for instance.

Holding people up. Evans is unequivocal — the answer is good journalism. So who is producing the best journalism? Given the phone tapping scandal and dumbing down accusations, the answer may. You want a reaction. For me, to 1, words is journalistic sonnet form. You just get to know it, and you get to know how many ideas you can have in that space — probably three.

The fear of the deadline can be exciting, but you have to get to a point where you trust yourself to do it. Jeremy [Clarkson, a friend and fellow columnist] writes incredibly fast and it reads like that — he can write his column in half an hour. Everything I write takes four hours. Writing for America is very different.

American publishing is incredibly over-manned — or properly manned, depending on how you see it. Here, you just get hit by Piers Morgan. The great thing about journalism is that you get these repeated, intense moments of accomplishment. But I still get that little hit on Sunday. I still go down to get the papers, and the first thing I turn to is my byline.

I still get that thrill about my name in print. That never goes away. Routine, rhythm and pleasing Rupert. Columnist and author AA Gill reveals his tricks of the trade. Words by Emma Dibdin. Apps to You can also share stories easily on Twitter, Facebook, Instapaper or by email. It has a user friendly home page and sections include everything from local news to wacky world events and sports to entertainment.

Apps for It includes charts for every possible pair of currencies — around 30, — with historical rates dating back up to a year. Frequent travellers can store their 10 favourite currencies for frequent monitoring. Cost: Free. It pools flight information from around the world, granting you access to real-time flight itineraries. Maps, weather forecasts and flight issue predictions are also available and the app will send push alerts to your handset when the status of your flight changes.

Word Lens is an essential purchase for any journalist with rusty language skills. It instantly translates printed words from one language into another with the built-in video camera. The current version is only available in Spanish to English and vice versa but more languages will be available soon. It converts all media files into correct, web friendly formats. Foursquare is a valuable tool for the networking journalist. It helps you meet contacts in the area as well as build up your profile.

Hootsuite schedules when updates to your Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and other accounts go live. You can track your results and popularity and check industry trends. Edit your photos with Photoshop Express, a mobile version of the industry-standard Adobe Photoshop software. The app includes handy features that allow you to crop, rotate, colour-correct and tint photos. Available on: iPhone, iPad, Android. Turn your phone into a mobile television studio using Qik.

Available on: iPhone, Android, BlackBerry. Give your videos a professional finish with ReelDirector. Edit videos by arranging clips on the scrollable timeline, or make use of features like splicing and trimming clips, recording soundtracks, and inserting text and transitions into your videos.

Available on: iPhone, iPad. The app allows you to make text notes, take photos, record voice memos and then upload them to your online account. Keen note-takers can organise their files into different notebooks, and the smart search function can even find handwritten text from within your photos. Available on: iPhone, iPad, Android, BlackBerry Dropbox converts your phone into a mobile hard disk, giving you remote access to files saved on your computer.

Files that you drag into the Dropbox folder on your computer automatically sync with the app, allowing you to view them on the move, or from your online account. With Vlingo you can send text messages, dial contacts, search Google and update your Twitter or Facebook status, simply by speaking into your phone.

The app converts your words into text with remarkable accuracy, and can even read newly received messages to you aloud. Audio is available to download, or you can simply stream footage straight to your smartphone with Wi-Fi or a 3G connection. Cost: Free Available on: Android. Urbanspoon is the ultimate guide to eating out. It locates the nearest restaurants which you can filter according to area, price range or food type. Or shake your phone and let the app select a restaurant at random.

In Cut the Rope your task is to feed hungry monster OmNom. Weird but addictive. Cost: 59p Available on: iPhone, iPad Android version coming soon. Surely for editors throughout the land there can be no two sweeter words. The union of Prince William and Kate Middleton is a gift to journalists that will keep on giving, long after the vows are exchanged at Westminster Abbey.

But as magazines, newspapers and broadcasters prepare to reveal the innermost secrets of the latest royal couple, what do we know about the working practices of the mysterious and occasionally exotic band of journalists who make a living reporting on the House of Windsor — the royal correspondents? The relationship between the royals and the media is a tempestuous one.

In some cases they are like family friends. For others, things are not so amicable. And it would appear that the royals are also capable of offending the press. That was about familiarity, introducing Kate to us and introducing us to Kate. Hughes remembers one such incident. Suspicions of hacking were raised when NoW published a story saying that Bradby had lent William broadcasting equipment to edit his gap year videos together, something that only he and two other people would have known.

But not all encounters between the press and the royals are so intimate. We once saw that the Queen had a hole in her shoe because she was sitting with her legs crossed. Lots of women were in fancy dress and scantily clad. Additional reporting by Harriet Thurley. Every day a little-known band of workers risk their lives to help foreign correspondents report in the most dangerous places on earth. It ended with her bullet-ridden body being dumped at the side of the road in Basra. Al-Khal and freelance American journalist Steven Vincent had been investigating police death squads in Iraq.

The two captives were eventually bundled out of the vehicle and told to run. She was hit once in the leg and twice in the chest. Their bodies were dumped together back in central Basra as a warning to all media workers in Iraq. But the plight of al-Khal, who miraciously survived, was quickly forgotten.

The fixer is often bodyguard, interviewer, guide to local traditions and cultures, historian and connection to elusive individuals, all in one. The role is difficult to define, transgressing far beyond that of translator or driver and often including all of the traditional reporting jobs. Danger is the one certainty of working as a fixer in a war zone. In some instances, where it is too dangerous for the journalist to leave a protected zone, fixers can even be wholly responsible for a story.

But not only do fixers not receive the same prestige and credit as journalists, they are rarely afforded the same protection. She was transferred to Baghdad and protected in FBI custody. Until one day they decided it was time for her to move on. One such individual was Afghan fixer Ajmal Naqshbandi, who was beheaded by the Taliban in after he was kidnapped with Italian journalist Daniele Mastrogiacomo and their driver. Mastrogiacomo was released in exchange for five Taliban militants but demands for two more militants for Naqshbandi were not met, provoking questions about the different valuation placed on journalists and fixers by the Italian government.

This apparent lack of importance is a stark contrast to how invaluable fixers typically are. Streetwise, trustworthy and 0. Top: Security forces try to control a crowd in front of the Palestinian parliament, Oct Bottom: Aftermath of an explosion in Rafah, Gaza The dependable fixer comes from all walks of life and in all guises.

Sometimes a good fixer is also a local journalist or someone recommended by another correspondent. Or the correspondent might be greeted at Hyderabad airport in India by someone like Ali, an entrepreneur and fan of Sherlock Holmes novels from a tiny village nearby. Ali spotted the opportunity to use his good English and colourfully decorated car to lift himself and his family out of poverty. Or the journalist might be lucky enough to be referred to Riko, a legendary figure in the East Congo fixing community, with his leather jackets, shades and reputation for introducing journalists to a cannibal rebel leader in a secret deep jungle location.

Finding a fixer can be particularly difficult in countries with strongly autocratic regimes, such as Algeria, Yemen, Syria, Libya and Iran, where even local journalists have no concept of a free, investigative press. In these countries it is hard sometimes to tell a fixer from a government spy. Adwan Adwan became a fixer in Gaza aged He worked for three years until he left to study journalism at City in Jazeera English and Bloomberg TV, is familiar with this difficulty.

I could be worth millions, especially if I was Italian or French; their governments almost always pay. For many individuals, working as a fixer is a life enriching experience not just because it pays so well. He recalls how Ali Kahan, the fixer he worked with in India, gained a prestigious reputation in his village.

When I helped a photojournalist and news editor from AFP cover the Israeli seizure of a neighbourhood in Rafah on 19 May , it was only chance that saved us from the Israeli air strike. We started out around 6am to cover the situation inside the besieged neighbourhood.

People from inside were being interviewed live on the radio. We have kids. Here, the police were able to protect all of them together. Someone told us that there was a peaceful demonstration against the siege. We were driving towards it, just minutes away, when there was a loud explosion and plumes of smoke.

The journalists were really scared. We could have been there. So we stopped the car for a few minutes and waited to see what had happened. When we arrived we found there had been 11 killed. Their bodies had all been evacuated but it was still a mess. There was blood everywhere.

And body parts. In these situations the protocol is to go from the scene to the hospital, where you can interview families of the dead. But not all of the bodies could fit in the morgue because it was already full from previous days.

Some were in a big fridge nearby usually used for storing flowers. The bodies were in rows with blood soaked sheets over them. But you could still see their faces. I give the world peace, love and beauty with my flowers and this is what I get back. Dead people, blood, misery, sadness. Sometimes we finish as late as 11 or 12pm, grab a few hours sleep and then get up again if something big happens. It is very important not to get wrong what somebody has said.

You can get into a lot of trouble in Gaza. She says that on occasion journalists have neglected to pay her for researching and writing entire stories anyway. All they could find out was his name, the fact that he had been killed by a suicide bomber as he left a hotel in Baghdad, and that he had worked for The Times for seven years. Clearly they had no clue who he was, because there was no contract, no other paperwork.

No journalist would. Agha was beheaded and Mastrogiacomo released in exchange for the release of five Taliban militants. Demands for two more in exchange for fixer Naqshbandi were not met and he was beheaded two weeks later.

Other fixers find it hard to maintain such conviction in the value of their work. We argued and he stormed off, but we made up the next day. This, Cookson admits, is the nature of news. Many are like Iraqi fixer Yasser who, when the International Federation of Journalists IFJ came to record his death in their annual report on media staff.

Palestinian civilians rush for cover during a clash between Fatah militants and militants of the Hamas movement, June It can mean the difference between getting treatment or dying. Thousands of miles away in the UK, it is understandable that news desks might underappreciate the role of the fixer, either failing to credit them with a byline or neglecting to report their abduction or death. By and large good reporters do that.

She felt that she was not only abandoned by the FBI but also by most of the journalists she worked for. In the end she was rescued primarily, she says, because of the efforts of the widow of Steven Vincent, the journalist who was murdered alongside her.

This was a long and difficult process, taking 18 months of dedication on the part of Ramaci. Al-Khal is all too aware of how easily she could have been forgotten, left living alone in a hotel, unable to find a job or even see relatives in Baghdad for fear of jeopardising their safety. Many fixers have been used and abandoned and betrayed. Many of them. He was murdered when the crew stopped to film the border between Lebanon and Israel.

Takkoush stayed in the car to phone his son while the others got out. He was telling his son not to worry because they were in a quiet place when an Israeli shell smashed into his Mercedes. The commander held the pair captive for eight months. They managed to escape by tiring their guards with a game of checkers, sneaking past once they were asleep and climbing over the ten foot wall of the compound.

This is business time. In , at the age of 45 and after 23 successful years in newspapers — he was at various times financial editor and political editor at The Financial Times and City editor at The Sunday Telegraph — he made the transition to television. I took the view that the way to approach that kind of thing was to respond to criticism that was constructive and ignore the stuff that was personal and horrible. In the run up to the financial crash of , he was one of the few people who warned of problems within the markets.

But did I do enough to warn about what was coming? But why not? Until it was too late. And then there was the housing market. The general consensus, among economists and journalists alike, was that house prices were rising and would continue to do so.

Every newspaper had a property supplement, and property advertising brought in huge revenues. That the fact that I reported that Northern Rock had run out of money and gone to the Bank of England for a bail out caused the so-called run. Well, as a journalist it was a very difficult time. The challenge will be trying to persuade people that deepening their knowledge of all this stuff matters, even in the good times. Now hacks fight for space with NYU students.

Try the dry Manhattan. Hotel Nacional de Cuba Foreign correspondents rub shoulders with international film stars at this bar that offers sunset views over the Florida Straits. Usher your source inside for a private conversation, and order a Havana Club on the rocks to get them on side. Calle O, Havana.

Mingle with famous footballers over a Birra Moretti. Piazzale Lotto 14, Milan. Juan Valdez offers a relaxed and discreet atmosphere - important, as competition between journalists is often intense in Columbia. Some of the best stories start life over a round of drinks. The Bookworm This is a lending library with a difference.

Here Time Out journalists pore over books as a barman pours them drinks. Sip a mojito, made with mint grown on the rooftop garden. Nan Sanlitun Rd, Beijing. Ying Yang Take sources to the rooftop bar for views of skyscrapers and boutiques along the Ann Siang Road.

Try a lychee martini. Sippers Bar Close to Al Jazeera offices, this is a popular pub for discerning wire service reporters. It was a refuge for journalists during the election crisis in Hacks turned up for much-needed sustenance while they wrote. Argwings Kodhek Rd, Nairobi. The Opera Bar In the hub of the city under the shadow of skyscrapers and overlooking the Opera House, this bar is a post-work favourite with journalists.

It is teeming with hacks on a Friday night networking amid the stunning views. Sydney Opera House, Sydney For an interactive map on where to get sauced go to xcity-magazine. Journalists join the crowd for story tip-offs from Samoans. Apia, Upolu, Samoa. But how easy is it to make the leap and can novel writing pay the bills? Elizabeth Davis reports. Works by journalists fill the shelves in bookstores and, perhaps unsurprisingly, it is non-fiction that dominates — whether accessible history from Andrew Marr or uproarious autobiography from Caitlin Moran.

Writing fiction has also proved a lucrative career path for a growing number of journalists. Among City alumni alone, more than 40 boast the title of novelist or author. So as newspaper and magazine circulations continue to tumble, now might seem the perfect time to dig out and dust off that manuscript from the bottom drawer.

And surely a background in journalism would be the ideal preparation for writing books? Jonathan Myerson thinks not. Writing a news story, on the other hand, usually demands that all key facts are provided in the first paragraph and ideally in the first sentence. The novelist must leave questions unanswered. They have to hold back, they would kill a novel by making it clear. She decided to sign up to the novel writing MA at City University when she moved back to England from Dubai last summer.

But I always liked to write so I took the easy route and just started freelancing. Having worked for many years as a science journalist, Hersham began writing fiction. The White Road and Other Stories is her first collection. All of which would not be ideal for journalism — it is certainly not what I was trained to do. Once you know how to write and ask questions, you know how to write a good novel. A plot is basically a story, you use the same skills for both.

Where journalism is often collaborative, hectic and noisy, novel writing demands that you work alone and quietly. Jojo Moyes newspaper, worked as a reporter and news editor at The Independent for 10 years before jumping ship. Moyes says the change in working environment was what she found hardest.

I loved the people I worked with, the banter, the black humour, the adrenaline of meeting deadlines. To go from that hardcore national newspaper journalism to. I found journalism far easier than novel-writing. Having a brief, a word count and the whip of a deadline is more contained than saying to yourself. I find it very easy for days to go by without writing. Journalism also greatly helped my writing style. I was lucky enough to start out at a very good paper with editors who cared about the writing.

I was encouraged to write in my voice and that helped me to establish what my voice was. Having said that, in journalism you are directed by the nature of the publication you are writing for. There is the assumption that novel writing is the greater attainment. It may be, but they are very different skills. Now I do a lot of other things to pay the bills.

Until recently, I never took advances on work — I just wrote the book and sold it. I had the good fortune of being paid a great deal of money to do a weekly column at The Independent, so on the proceeds of that I could finance writing my novels. Saul Bellow goes for a run every morning to get inspired — I must do that sometime! I would say, cut back on the talking about it and do it. As told to Olivia Wakefield. Compared to most journalism, novel writing is poorly paid.

I feel like the safest thing is not to be dependent on one stream of income. Most writers I know have two or three strings to their bow and do a bit of journalism on the side. I think the safest thing is not to let anything dry up. Between roughly and the book world had this unprecedented boom in terms of the money that was generated by it. They were over paid. This period was an aberration, which is now over.

Very few people [now] make a lot of money out of selling books in the UK. The fees that are paid by publishers to authors have been frozen for several years, and in some cases cut. I was earning more per book ten years ago than I am today.

I have just about reached the point where it is becoming impossible to earn a living. A publisher. It gives you a profile and access to lots of extraordinary stories. Also when you initially speak to a publisher or an agent they know that you have a history of published writing, they know you have some kind of track record. Imogen Edwards-Jones believes this can give hacks a distinct advantage.

Publishers say there are two types of journalists who become authors: those that hit the deadline and those who never get the book done in the first. The top prize spend the cream of your working day alone writing something no in the BBC National Short Story Award — the biggest in the world for one sees and may never see.

The vast majority of advances are now tiny for novelists and Whichever route someone takes into novel writing, the key is a print journalism is being squeezed by free online content. So which strong desire to write. AD Miller, author and Britain editor on The is the more viable career? The answer may lie not in attempting to Economist, published his first book Snowdrops earlier this year. The idea is the hardest bit, then And therein, perhaps, lies the moral of this tale.

Journalism definitely prepared me well. But you have to think your. George Eliot Eliot, whose real name was Mary Ann Evans, began writing for the Westminster Review, a radical journal, in She later became its editor, putting her at the heart of literary society at the time.

Her first novel, Adam Bede, was published in to great success. This was followed by Middlemarch , and The Mill on the Floss Photo: the Guardian. Mark Twain River boat pilot, soldier and journalist. Twain tried his hand at all these careers before writing novels.

He went on to work for a string of papers including the San Francisco Call and published his most famous work, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, in Guy de Maupassant Maupassant was a poet and short story writer at the heart of Parisian literary life. But he also worked as a journalist and editor.

His sparse writing style, it has been argued, stems from his work as a journalist and short story writer. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in It sold so well that Greene left his job to become a full-time novelist. Unfortunately his next two books were commercial failures but these were soon followed by A Gun for Sale and Our Man in Havana , before his most famous work, Brighton Rock was published in Twit Awards The votes are in, the Twitterati wait with bated breath.

Miranda Thompson reveals the top Twits of the year. The judging panel witnessed outstanding dedication to the cause of character updates. Nominees were compiled using a variety of criteria: activity online, prominence in their field and quality of published content. To view the shortlist of nominees for the Twit Awards, go to x-citymagazine.

Judges enjoyed her comprehensive coverage of life in the Glamour office, from free cakes to fashion week highlights. Choice music selections from the front line of radio are mixed in with viral video content and banter from his blog. Those with an insatiable appetite for gossip should refer to his long-running feud with Katie Price. Watch her timeline to see the newscaster in action as she collects information to update or break stories, as well as chatting back to keen followers.

Dismissed as obsolete and under threat from bloggers - is criticism on its last legs? Elizabeth Davis and Emma Dibdin talk to four leading critics to get the diagnosis. The explosion of online criticism happened at the same time as a lot of US papers laid off film critics, so people made a connection between the two.

What credentials have they got? My job is to provide a bit of stimulus. I mean, who cares what you think of Inception? I like the idea of being an evangelist for something good which people might not hear about otherwise. Criticism is a contradictory form to a culture that is constantly saying that things are better than they are.

So you have that sense of contradiction and of an argument having to be made. A forceful piece of criticism in print form is supposed to be an unadulterated personal response to a piece. I used to work on Kaleidoscope, when it still existed before becoming Front Row. It went out much later in the evening and that enabled you to do live reviews. You would literally have somebody coming out of the theatre, straight into the radio car and doing a review down the line to the presenter. There was an immediacy that has, to a certain extent, disappeared.

One thing that I find unnerving about internet criticism is how good a lot of it is. The best criticism is a really good ripple. People think of it — I think wrongly — as a functionary thing, to let you know whether you want to buy that record, go and see that film. People want content in whatever form, for free.

Criticism in newspapers and magazines is being challenged by the sheer volume of material available on the internet. The internet has resulted in a huge proliferation of information sources. And the growth of social media over the past 12 to 18 months adds a completely different dimension again. Our first user review was posted in and since then we have published 27, By new media standards we are old media now, and we are seen as very established by the bloggers because we have a professional critic in Michael Coveney — who lots of people love to loathe.

But the nature of criticism is changing. Nobody — certainly not the critics — thinks anymore that critics have all the power. But a reviewer who knows their stuff should always have a place. Transformers 2 was universally panned, and now the director and most of the cast are admitting it was shit, though at the time they got quite offended. The main effect Twitter has had is that as a critic, you want to get your response out there immediately.

It happened last year with The Social Network. A critic absolutely needs to have knowledge of their subject. Editors often think they can just throw TV reviews at anybody who watches telly, but the great critics are the ones who absolutely love and know about television. In the internet age, there are just more voices to pay attention to. A fifteen-year-old film fan is just as likely to be swayed by the opinion of their favourite blogger or website as they are by what we say or what Empire says.

You have to take the readership into account when writing for a magazine. I sometimes fill in for Mark Kermode on Five Live, which is a brilliant thing to be asked to do. I asked him where to, and he said obituaries. Rusbridger was entrusting the then arts editor, who had helped him launch both g2 and Guardian Weekend, with a task that would help a struggling paper assert its place among its broadsheet rivals. Tucked away inside the printed pages, the obituaries are at the heart of the quality press in Britain and are a staple part of the newspaper diet.

The obituary today is the hallmark of a serious paper, and helps to set the broadsheets apart from their tabloid counterparts. In the Guardian, up until , obituaries had been rather unhappily accommodated in the lively and irreverent features section that was g2. But as part of a major overhaul of the paper, they were moved into the main pages, with Mayes overseeing the transformation.

It is, in the end, another page in the newspaper and up for comparison with a page performing a similar function in its rivals. The established but boring obituaries pages of The Daily Telegraph were revitalised by Hugh Massingberd, who introduced anecdote and character to obituaries. The obituaries pages of these papers gained in popularity almost immediately, forcing The Times and eventually the Guardian under Rusbridger to adapt theirs accordingly. But why are people so interested in reading about the deaths of others?

And anyway, even younger readers get old. Tim Bullamore, award-winning obituary writer for The Telegraph, relishes these occasions, because they provide an opportunity not just to remind people of a life, but to retell a forgotten story. Newspapers would be much poorer without them.

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